Degree Programs

The department offers 2 degrees and a minor. An overview of each program is shown below. More detailed information is available on the Advising Information page.

BS Computer Science

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science program at the Valdosta State University is accredited by the ABET Computing Accreditation Commission. For more information on ABET visit www.abet.org.

ABET Accreditation

The mission of the Computer Science program is:

To educate our students for successful careers in computing or pursuing graduate studies, through a deep understanding of the foundations of computer science, technical expertise, teamwork, and leadership for the benefit of the community, region, and society.

The Program Educational Objectives (PEO’s) for the Computer Science program are shown below. PEO's are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years of graduation. The Program Educational Objectives form the framework for the curriculum for the Computer Science program at VSU as well as support the mission of the department, college, and university.

  1. Graduates will distinguish themselves in breadth of perspective and the ability to solve complex problems.

  2. Graduates will work effectively in groups that include other computer scientists, and stakeholders from other disciplines, effectively communicating with their peers, customers, supervisors, and others through both written and oral means.

  3. Graduates will know how to teach themselves new concepts and technologies, remaining current in their field through the pursuit of life-long learning.

The CS Program provides students with a major focus in computer science, a broad-based general education, and a strong foundation in mathematics. The CS Program, like the CIS Program focuses on problem solving, analysis, design, and implementation of software systems. Graduates of the program will have an ability to:

  1. Analyze a complex computing problem and apply principles of computing and other relevant disciplines to identify solutions.

  2. Design, implement, and evaluate a computing-based solution to meet a given set of computing requirements in the context of the program's discipline.

  3. Communicate effectively in variety of professional contexts.

  4. Recognize professional responsibilities and make informed judgments in computing practice based on legal and ethical principles.

  5. Function effectively as a member or leader of a team engaged in activities appropriate to the program's discipline.

  6. Apply computer science theory and software development fundamentals to produce computing-based solutions.

A degree in CS can lead to many different kinds of jobs dealing with computers and with people: computer programmer, software engineers, software architect, help-desk, networking specialist, computer-system manager, consultant, database analyst, computer training specialist, and others are all possible careers. It also prepares students for graduate work in CS or CIS.

See the Advising Information for a sample program which shows how the degree requirements could be distributed over four years, a detailed checklist, and a degree tree that shows the required computer science and math courses and their prerequisites.

CS Program Enrollment and Degree Data

(as of December 2014)

Academic Year

Enrollment Year

Total

Enrollment

BSCS Degrees Awarded

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

2014-2015

FT

43

48

28

22

10

159

14

PT

3

6

8

1

7

29

2013-2014

FT

76

49

28

18

6

184

14

PT

10

15

1

10

2

42

2012-2013

FT

71

41

21

10

8

153

10

PT

9

6

9

4

2

36

2011-2012

FT

52

29

19

13

7

124

12

PT

11

13

2

3

3

37

2010-2011

FT

50

29

15

12

4

111

10

PT

11

4

5

1

7

33

CS Industrial Advisory Board

  • Brian Haugabrook, CIO, Valdosta State University

  • Dan Henry - Senior Systems Architect, Azalea Health

  • Lin McMichen - Manager, IT Implementation at ClientTell Inc

  • Mark Lindsey, Systems Engineer and Partner, ECG

  • Ryan Williams - Partner & VP of Business Development Nexxtep Technology Services, Inc.

BS Computer Information Systems

The CIS Program, like the CS Program focuses on problem solving, analysis, design, and implementation of software systems. However, the CIS curriculum has a strong business component with courses in Accounting, Economics, and Management. Also, the CIS program offers breadth of knowledge by requiring courses in software engineering, database, and networking. A second course in one these areas is required as well as an option to take a third course.

The difference between the CS and CIS degrees can be described as follows: CS requires more and more advanced math and science classes while the CIS degree requires 6 courses from the College of Business. In terms of CS classes, there is very little difference between CS and CIS, essentially only CS 3520 (Algorithms), CS 4500 ( Formal Languages and Automata Theory), and CS 4900 (Senior Seminar) which are required by the CS degree but not CIS. Essentially, 13 of the 14 required CS courses for the CIS degree are the same as those required for the CS degree. For more see the Differences between CS and CIS.

A degree in CIS, like CS can lead to many different kinds of jobs dealing with computers and with people: computer programmer, software engineer, software architect, help-desk support specialist, networking specialist, computer-system manager, consultant, database analyst, computer training specialist, and others are all possible careers.

See the Advising Information for a sample program which shows how the degree requirements could be distributed over four years, a detailed checklist, and a degree tree that shows the required computer science and math courses and their prerequisites.

This program provides students with a major in mathematics within the framework of a broad-based general education. The "traditional" mathematics degree, it is intended primarily as preparation for the study of mathematics at the graduate level.

See the Advising Information for a sample program which shows how the degree requirements could be distributed over four years, a detailed checklist, and a degree tree that shows the required math courses and their prerequisites.

Minor in Computer Science

The Mathematics and Computer Science Department offers a minor in Computer Science which requires 17 hours of course work.

These courses are required: CS 1301, CS 1302, CS 3101, CS 3410, and one additional course (3 credits) at the 3000 level or above.

See the Advising Information for a detailed checklist