Performance Standard 7

Positive Learning Environment

Performance Standard 7: Positive Learning Environment:

The teacher candidate provides a well-managed, safe, and orderly environment that is conducive to learning and encourages respect for all.

 

Performance Indicators at the Level III Level

7.1 Responds to disruptions in a timely, appropriate manner.

 7.2 Establishes clear expectations for classroom rules, routines, and procedures and enforces them consistently and appropriately.

 7.3 Models caring, fairness, respect, and enthusiasm for learning.

7.4 Promotes a climate of trust and teamwork within the classroom.

7.5 Promotes respect for and understanding of students’ diversity, including – but not limited to – race, color, religion, sex, national origin, or disability.

7.6 Actively listens and pays attention to students’ needs and responses

. 7.7 Creates a warm, attractive, inviting, and supportive classroom environment.

7.8 Arranges the classroom materials and resources to facilitate group and individual activities.

Performance Rubrics

Level I

Level II

Level III

Level IV

The teacher candidate inadequately addresses student behavior, displays a negative attitude toward students, ignores safety standards, or does not otherwise provide an orderly environment that is conducive to learning or encourages respect for all.

 The teacher candidate inconsistently provides a well-managed, safe, and orderly environment that is conducive to learning and encourages respect for all.

The teacher candidate consistently provides a well-managed, safe, and orderly environment that is conducive to learning and encourages respect for all.

 The teacher candidate continually engages students in a collaborative and self-directed learning environment where students are encouraged to take risks and ownership of their own learning behavior. (Teacher candidates rated as Exemplary continually seek ways to serve as role models or teacher leaders. This level is not intended for formative assessments of teacher candidates and may only be used in the summative assessment with proper documentation of the teacher candidate’s consistent performance at this level.)

 

Examples of Evidence/Artifacts to demonstrate performance on this standard:

  • Atmosphere characterized by coldness and indifference.
  • No trust between students and teachers.
  • Students are in self-protection mode instead of learning mode.
  • No routines established.
  • Routines established at odd times of the year.
  • Cannot effectively use praise, attention, reward, privileges, differential attention, time out, and punishment.
  • Unrealistic expectations, inadvertently reinforcing undesirable behavior, and modeling negative behavior.
  • Rely on punishment, most frequently reprimands, rather than positive reinforcement.

 

What it is:

What it isn't:

  • Establishing and communicating guidelines for expected behavior, monitoring student behavior, keeping students on task, and infusing humor, care, and respect into the classroom interactions, so as to develop a climate that is conducive to student learning.
  • Considering the physical arrangement of the classroom, discipline and routines, organization of learning activities, and the engagement of students with tasks
  • Developing functional floor plans with teacher and student work areas and furniture/materials placement for optimal benefit.
  • Establishing classroom rules and procedures early on in the school year.
  • Orchestrating smooth transitions and maintaining momentum throughout teaching and learning.
  • Using effective questioning, smooth transitions, and challenging but interesting activities to increase student engagement in learning and student accountability.
  • Protecting instruction from disruption and makes the most out of every instructional moment.
  • Assuming responsibility for student learning, setting high (but reasonable) expectations for all students, and supporting students in achieving them.
  • Establishing rapport and trustworthiness with students by being fair, caring, respectful, and enthusiastic.
  • Organizing and maintaining an effective classroom environment.
  • Having a sense of “with-it-ness,” which can be translated as being aware of when routines need to be altered or an intervention may be needed to prevent behavior problems.
  • Fostering relationships where respect and learning are central so students feel safe in taking risks that are associated with learning and believes in the students.
  • Being culturally competent and attuned to students’ interests both in and out of school.
  • Establishing good discipline, effective routines, smooth transitions, and ownership of the environment as components of establishing a supportive and collaborative climate.
  • Orienting the classroom for instruction, preparing and organizing materials, and framing lessons in a coherent and logical manner.
  • Implementing good classroom management to establish order, engage students, and elicit student cooperation, with an ultimate purpose to establish and maintain an environment conducive to instruction and learning. 
  • Being preventive rather than reactive.
  • Creating well-managed classrooms by identifying and teaching desirable behaviors to students.
  • Maintaining their management system by “monitoring and providing prompt feedback, pacing class activities to keep them moving, and by consistently applying classroom procedures and consequence.”
  • Building a classroom climate where error (i.e., risk taking) is welcomed, where student questioning is high, where engagement is the norm, and where students can gain reputations as effective learners.
  • Using authentic conversation to learn about students and encourage students to engage their peers’ ideas.
  • Following classroom procedures consistently, contributing to a safe and orderly environment.
  • Showing respect for students.
  • Giving regular acknowledgements, celebrations, and recognitions.

 

 

  • Atmosphere characterized by coldness and indifference.
  • No trust between students and teachers.
  • Students are in self-protection mode instead of learning mode.
  • No routines established.
  • Routines established at odd times of the year.
  • Cannot effectively use praise, attention, reward, privileges, differential attention, time out, and punishment.
  • Unrealistic expectations, inadvertently reinforcing undesirable behavior, and modeling negative behavior.
  • Rely on punishment, most frequently reprimands, rather than positive reinforcement.

 

 

Sample Questions for Conferencing:

  • What are some examples of the ways you make connections with your students?
  • How have you strived to make your classroom an inclusive one?
  • How do you address inappropriate behavior?
  • How do you recognize and celebrate diversity in your classroom?
  • How do you encourage students to celebrate other students’ success?
  • Reference and for more information visit

 

Reference and for more information visit

https://www.gadoe.org/School-Improvement/Teacher-and-Leader-Effectiveness/Documents/TKES%20Fact%20%20Sheets%207-11-2012.pdf