November 25, 2014:

June 3, 1998
98-175

Jennifer Tanner
Communications Specialist

College of Nursing�s home to be named for retired Valdosta State president

Dr. Hugh C. Bailey, president of Valdosta State University, has announced that the facility currently housing the VSU College of Nursing will be named in honor of President Emeritus Dr. S. Walter Martin.

Brookwood Hall, acquired by the institution in 1985 and located on Patterson Street across from the University Center, will be officially dedicated as S. Walter Martin Hall during ceremonies at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, June 12, in Whitehead Auditorium.

"Dr. Martin is one of the most significant educators in Georgia history," Bailey said. "Under his leadership, the college experienced one of its most significant periods of growth and development. His contributions are immeasurable."

Martin was president of Valdosta State from 1966 to 1978, and supervised the creation of the Nursing program in 1968.

Before coming to Valdosta State, Martin held numerous leadership positions in higher education. He was the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Georgia from 1949-1957; president of Emory University, 1957-1962; vice chancellor of the University System of Georgia, 1962-1966, serving as acting chancellor from 1964-1965.

In addition to many other community activities, Martin is a continuing member of the Valdosta Rotary Club (president, 1971-1972); member of the board of directors of the Valdosta-Lowndes County Chamber of Commerce (1966-1978); and member of the board of directors of the Valdosta-Lowndes County United Way (1973-1975).

Some achievements at Valdosta State during Martin's 12-year tenure as president:

Nevins Hall constructed, 1966

College Union Building constructed (1966) and expanded (1976)

Palms Dining Center renovated, 1969

Fine Arts Building constructed, 1969

Odum Library constructed, 1972

Education Center constructed, 1973

Student enrollment increased from 2,000 to 5,000 during Martin's tenure. The faculty grew from 85 to almost 250. The number of degrees offered grew from three to 14, including the Education Specialist degree.